• Whiskey Tastings – June 2013

    Celtic Whiskey Shop & Wines on the Green, 27-28 Dawson Street, Dublin 2

    Celtic Whiskey Shop, 10th Anniversary.

    Whiskey and Chocolate tasting – Thursday 20th June, 2pm-6pm

    Whiskey and Chocolate tasting – Friday 21st June, 3pm-7pm

    Whiskey and Cheese tasting – Saturday 22nd June, 3pm-7pm

    See News/  Tastings -Whiskey Tastings  June 2013.

  • Whiskey Tastings June 2013

    This week at the Celtic Whiskey Shop and Wines on the Green we are celebrating a very special anniversary. On the 20th June 2003 we first opened our doors for trading and here we are still going strong after ten years. We would like to thank our customers for supporting us through those ten years and would like to extend an invitation to join us in-store from Thursday to Saturday this week for some extra special free in-store tastings (more details below).

    As you would expect we are also celebrating by releasing some commemorative whiskeys to mark the event. Since 2008 we have released a line of single cask Midleton whiskeys and tomorrow we are launching something very special from them. We also have a special bottling of single malt From Cooley distillery that was put together in conjunction with the good people from Inish Turk Beg whiskey. We have set these whiskeys up online this evening but will add images etc when they arrive tomorrow.

    In other news we have just become Irish agents for Glengoyne single malt whiskies. To celebrate this we will be adding it to some of the tastings in-store this week, concentrating on their superb 18 year-old. We will, also, add a few introductory offers.

    Finally, planning for this years distillery trip is a bit behind schedule but is booked from 10th-14th October. We are starting with Tomatin distillery followed by Glenmorangie & have bookings at BenRiach & GlenDronach. I will try to fill in the blanks next week or the week after.

    Midleton Rum Cask Matured 2001 Blended Irish Whiskey Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary Bottling €150.00

    Our very first single cask from Midleton distillery was a blend and that’s been followed by a yearly release of a single pot still cask. For our anniversary bottling I requested something different & that’s exactly what I got! This bottling was vatted from two separate casks, one of single pot still whiskey and the other single grain whiskey. Both components where entirely matured in first fill Caribbean rum casks. It was distilled in 2001 and bottled less than 1 week ago. It was bottled at cask strength without chill-filtration. It is also, the first Midleton to carry Brian Nation’s signature as Master Distiller. It is fresh and juicy in character with aromas of lemon, guava, pineapple and a touch of cinnamon. The palate has plenty of body with citrus flavours and notes of pineapples, banana and other tropical fruits, becoming more spicy and gingery towards the finish. A fruity whiskey with some subtle influences coming from the rum casks. Delicious with or without a drop of water. Limited to 366 bottles, a number of which were used up doing this month’s Celtic Whiskey Club sample.

    Chief Islander’s Choice Single Malt Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary Bottling €125.00

    The Inish Turk Beg brand was put into a sort of limbo when its supply of single malt whiskey was cut-off last year. The unusually shaped bottle & deliciously fruity single malt has been exceptionally popular & we were lucky enough to get most of their stocks of which we have limited amounts left. However, we are delighted to inform you that we’ll hear plenty more from them in the years ahead, you’ll just have to watch this space! A conversation with the Chief Islander of Inish Turk Beg developed into the creation of this anniversary bottling. A limited edition bottling of just over 700 bottles which was bottled at 44%. Matured for a minimum of 10 years in ex-bourbon casks. These casks had spent a number of months on the shores of Inish Turk Beg breathing in the extraordinary environment. Nose: Delicate and fresh on the nose with aromas of orange sherbet, freshly sliced apples, pink grapefruit and fruit salad sweets. Palate: Fresh and fruity. Medium to full bodied with a nice mouthfeel. Flavours of orange peel, ripe apples, lemon curd, ginger snaps and tropical fruits. Finish: Dry and long lasting with vanilla and a touch of spiced apples coming through at the end.  A very good whiskey, fresh and packed full of vibrant fruit flavours.

    Special in-store tastings this Thursday, Friday & Saturday – Whiskey with Chocolate and Whiskey with Cheese tastings

    As mentioned above we will be showcasing some of our old and new favourite whiskeys from Thursday to Saturday this week. Below is the schedule and the list of whiskeys we will be tasting. Please pop in if you are nearby, it’s all free! We will be carefully matching each whiskey with chocolate on Thursday-Friday, with whiskey and cheese on the Saturday.

    Whiskey and Chocolate tasting – Thursday 20th June, 2pm-6pm

    Midleton Rum Cask Matured 2001 Blended Irish Whiskey Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary.

    Chief Islander’s Choice Single Malt Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary.

    Chocolate to be confirmed!

    Whiskey and Chocolate tasting – Friday 21st June, 3pm-7pm

    Teeling Whiskey Company 21 Year Old Single Malt.

    Bowmore Darkest 15 Year Old Single Malt, Scotland.

    Yamazaki 18 Year Old Single Malt, Japan.

    Chocolate to be confirmed.

    Whiskey and Cheese tasting – Saturday 22nd June, 3pm-7pm

    Midleton Rum Cask 12 Year Old Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary.

    Chief Islander’s Choice Single Malt Celtic Whiskey Shop 10th Anniversary.

    Glengoyne 18 Year Old Highland Single Malt, Scotland.

    Glen Garioch 12 Year Old Highland Single Malt, Scotland.

    Cheese selection to be confirmed.

    Glengoyne Highland Single Malts

    I was brought up somewhere in between Glengoyne & Auchentoshan distilleries which lie just 13 miles apart. Despite being so close to each other Auchentoshan is classified as a Lowland distillery & Glengoyne as a Highland distillery. Glengoyne only uses unpeated malt and the low-yielding but high quality Golden Promise strain of barley. Their whiskeys have a subtle and refined balance of flavour, but also great mouth-feel and lots of barley malt flavours. Judicious use of sherry casks adds some spice and dried fruit flavours throughout the range without overpowering the malt flavours. The visit to Glengoyne distillery last year was one of our highlights & I highly recommend you give them a try! We stock the 10 year-old, 12 year-old, cask strength, 15 year-old, 18 year-old & 21 year-old. I’ve highlighted 3 of my favourites below;

    Glengoyne 12 Year-Old Highland Single Malt €52.99 Special Offer €47.99 Save €5

    A great un-peated Highland malt. Soft, smooth and delicate but with good malted barley and sherry flavours. Glengoyne’s notes: Lemon zest, toffee apples – and a scent of coconut. Hand-selected sherry casks help create this paradise of flavours and rich, golden colour. It’s the taste of Scotland’s slowest distillation, and our insistence on barley dried by air – never peat.

    Glengoyne Cask Strength Highland Single Malt €64.99 Special Offer €56.99 Save €8

    More assertive and muscular than the rest of the range. The cask strength packs a punch but is still smooth and malty, surprisingly so for a whisky at 58.7%! Glengoyne’s Tasting Notes: Appearance: Amber gold. Nose: Warm baked custard, peppered strawberries, digestive biscuits, soft oak and a short sherbet tingle. Initial taste: Thick rosehip syrup, Demerara sugar developing into a spicy, gooseberry dryness. Wonderful balance, nothing dominates. After Water: Intensified syrup and green fruits. Finish: Very long. Comments: This is over 100 Proof, but you’d never know it.

    Glengoyne 18 Year-Old Highland Single Malt €99.99 Special Offer €86.99 Save €13

    This was my favourite from our visit to Glengoyne & we’re tasting in-store on Saturday. Rich and luxurious. An un-peated Highland malt packed with flavours of barley, orange peel and cocoa. Glengoyne’s Tasting Notes: Appearance: Medium gold with a rich glow. Nose: Awash with red apple, ripe melon and fresh banana. Heavenly and well rounded, it drifts into hot porridge topped with brown sugar. Initial taste: Full bodied, round and rich. At first macerated fruits, marzipan and walnuts; then warm spices, dry cocoa and lingering Seville marmalade. Finish: Long, warm and dry. Comments: Remarkable depth. Each glass unveils more layers.

  • Conchay Toro

    Cellar Notes

    Don Melchor
    Enrique Tirado
    2012 was a big year for Enrique Tirado the head winemaker for Don Melchor. He and his family
    took a year to immerse themselves in all things French, from language, to academics, to food, and of
    course, wine.
    It was a big decision to move my whole family to France for a year—but it was a good one. I’ve been working at Concha y Toro since
    1993 and have been in charge of Don Melchor since 1997, so it seemed like it was time for some fresh inspiration, to catch up on the
    latest techniques and thinking in the wine world. I’ve always loved Cabernet and Bordeaux-style wines, so there was never much
    question about where to go… Bordeaux it was, and so early in 2012, my wife and I with our four kids (ages 4 to 15) set off on a
    year-long adventure in France.
    I enrolled in the University of Bordeaux and completed an overarching diploma program as well as two additional smaller diplomas
    in specific areas. Ten courses total… all in French… what a challenge!
    I love working with Don Melchor—always have. When I was
    studying enology, I did my thesis project on Cabernet
    Sauvignon, and in 1992 (the year I graduated) I was invited to
    participate in a couple of blind tastings of “Top Chilean wines.”
    The amazing thing is that both times, my favorite wine, the one
    I ranked Nº 1, was Don Melchor. Needless to say, I was very
    happy to start working at Concha y Toro a year later, and thrilled
    when I joined the Don Melchor team in 1995. Imagine how I
    felt when they put me in charge two years later!
    Sure, I made some changes when I “inherited” Don Melchor, but
    it wasn’t a matter of style. That doesn’t change much over the
    years. It’s not a matter of winemaker style. My goal is to make an
    excellent Cabernet Sauvignon that fully expresses the natural
    characteristics of Puente Alto, in the Alto Maipo Valley. And that
    means special dedication in the vineyard, so the most important
    changes I implemented had to do with how we work in the
    vineyard. Any technology and methodology we incorporate is
    always in function of that goal.
    We’re looking for a wine with the perfect balance between
    Cabernet fruit and elegance. It’s not easy, and it doesn’t happen
    just anywhere. It takes terroir and know-how. What we have at
    Puente Alto is the Andes, which influences the soils—rocky soils
    mean good drainage—and the climate. We also have the human
    factor—a group of hard-working people dedicated to making
    Don Melchor everything it can and should be without
    overworking it. It’s important to know when to back off and let
    the wine be itself.
    We’ve just launched the 2009 vintage, and while it is clearly Don
    Melchor, it has its own character, mostly due to climatic
    differences. Both 2008 and 2009 were warm years, but the
    advantage we had in 2009 was that the soil absorbed more water
    over the winter and spring, so we didn’t have to irrigate until
    much later in the season, and that benefits the vines. When the
    CELLAR NOTES Nº
    1 JUNE 2013
    Enrique Tirado in Pauillac, France.
    But it wasn’t all about studying. We wanted a genuine French
    experience, to actually live there, to truly feel the culture—in situ
    and on a daily basis. Our kids went to school and all learned
    French. My wife studied cooking, and we traveled around the
    country every chance we got, visiting chateaux and immersing
    ourselves in the French way of life. It was a wonderful experience
    for each of us personally, for us as a family, and obviously for me,
    it was an excellent professional experience.
    My program spanned a wide range of areas, not only in the
    vineyard and cellar, but also included courses on research and
    communication. And while all of this information helped
    broaden, my way of looking at the field, my intention is
    not—and never has been—to try and copy a French model here
    in Chile. I don’t want to make a French wine; I want to make the
    best Chilean wine I can. We aim for a Cabernet Sauvignon that
    expresses the very best of Chile.
    One of the first things we did was sectorize the vineyards. Today
    we have a total of 127 hectares—114 in those days, and we
    divided them up into 100 parcels to work each independently
    and then organized them into seven overarching groups
    according to their characteristics to make the different Cabernet
    wines that ultimately go into the final Don Melchor blend.
    Over the years we have tweaked our techniques, improving
    canopy management, experimenting with irrigation methods,
    fine tuning harvest dates, etc. The same goes in the
    bodega—we’re continuously working on perfecting maceration
    schedules, punch downs, and timing, right down to the smallestsix seasons vinexpo 2013
    detail. In the end, making a fine wine is the culmination of an
    enormous number of decisions made at every step of the
    process—all aimed at producing the desired result, which in our
    case is a wine that shows plenty of fresh fruit, with lively acidity,
    pleasing concentration, and well-rounded tannins.
    plants have ready access to natural reserves of water the fruit
    conserves its freshness better, and this comes through in the
    2009. It has more fresh fruit expression and livelier acidity than
    the 2008. They’re similar in their composition—the 2009 has a
    bit more Cabernet Franc (4% vs. 3% in 2008), and both spent 15
    months in French oak barrels (72% new), so the differences are
    clearly due to the weather. The 2009 is full of red fruit and bright
    acidity to complement its greater depth and density.
    So what’s ahead? My family and I have already returned to “real
    life” here in Chile and are assimilating our tremendous
    experience into our own lives. For me, professionally, it’s a matter
    of reflecting on everything I learned last year and determining
    how and where I can apply it in my work. And for Don Melchor?
    We’ll have to see how it responds to the gentle adjustments we
    make to help it better express its own rich and unique personality.

    Enrique Tirado2012 was a big year for Enrique Tirado the head winemaker for Don Melchor. He and his family took a year to immerse themselves in all things French, from language, to academics, to food, and of course, wine.It was a big decision to move my whole family to France for a year—but it was a good one. I’ve been working at Concha y Toro since 1993 and have been in charge of Don Melchor since 1997, so it seemed like it was time for some fresh inspiration, to catch up on the latest techniques and thinking in the wine world. I’ve always loved Cabernet and Bordeaux-style wines, so there was never much question about where to go… Bordeaux it was, and so early in 2012, my wife and I with our four kids (ages 4 to 15) set off on a year-long adventure in France.I enrolled in the University of Bordeaux and completed an overarching diploma program as well as two additional smaller diplomas in specific areas. Ten courses total… all in French… what a challenge!I love working with Don Melchor—always have. When I was studying enology, I did my thesis project on Cabernet Sauvignon, and in 1992 (the year I graduated) I was invited to participate in a couple of blind tastings of “Top Chilean wines.” The amazing thing is that both times, my favorite wine, the one I ranked Nº 1, was Don Melchor. Needless to say, I was very happy to start working at Concha y Toro a year later, and thrilled when I joined the Don Melchor team in 1995. Imagine how I felt when they put me in charge two years later! Sure, I made some changes when I “inherited” Don Melchor, but it wasn’t a matter of style. That doesn’t change much over the years. It’s not a matter of winemaker style. My goal is to make an excellent Cabernet Sauvignon that fully expresses the natural characteristics of Puente Alto, in the Alto Maipo Valley. And that means special dedication in the vineyard, so the most important changes I implemented had to do with how we work in the vineyard. Any technology and methodology we incorporate is always in function of that goal.We’re looking for a wine with the perfect balance between Cabernet fruit and elegance. It’s not easy, and it doesn’t happen just anywhere. It takes terroir and know-how. What we have at Puente Alto is the Andes, which influences the soils—rocky soils mean good drainage—and the climate. We also have the human factor—a group of hard-working people dedicated to making Don Melchor everything it can and should be without overworking it. It’s important to know when to back off and let the wine be itself.We’ve just launched the 2009 vintage, and while it is clearly Don Melchor, it has its own character, mostly due to climatic differences. Both 2008 and 2009 were warm years, but the advantage we had in 2009 was that the soil absorbed more water over the winter and spring, so we didn’t have to irrigate until much later in the season, and that benefits the vines. When the CELLAR NOTES Nº1 JUNE 2013Enrique Tirado in Pauillac, France.But it wasn’t all about studying. We wanted a genuine French experience, to actually live there, to truly feel the culture—in situand on a daily basis. Our kids went to school and all learned French. My wife studied cooking, and we traveled around the country every chance we got, visiting chateaux and immersing ourselves in the French way of life. It was a wonderful experience for each of us personally, for us as a family, and obviously for me, it was an excellent professional experience.My program spanned a wide range of areas, not only in the vineyard and cellar, but also included courses on research and communication. And while all of this information helped broaden, my way of looking at the field, my intention is not—and never has been—to try and copy a French model here in Chile. I don’t want to make a French wine; I want to make the best Chilean wine I can. We aim for a Cabernet Sauvignon that expresses the very best of Chile.One of the first things we did was sectorize the vineyards. Today we have a total of 127 hectares—114 in those days, and we divided them up into 100 parcels to work each independently and then organized them into seven overarching groups according to their characteristics to make the different Cabernet wines that ultimately go into the final Don Melchor blend.Over the years we have tweaked our techniques, improving canopy management, experimenting with irrigation methods, fine tuning harvest dates, etc. The same goes in the bodega—we’re continuously working on perfecting maceration schedules, punch downs, and timing, right down to the smallest detail. In the end, making a fine wine is the culmination of an enormous number of decisions made at every step of the process—all aimed at producing the desired result, which in our case is a wine that shows plenty of fresh fruit, with lively acidity, pleasing concentration, and well-rounded tannins.plants have ready access to natural reserves of water the fruit conserves its freshness better, and this comes through in the 2009. It has more fresh fruit expression and livelier acidity than the 2008. They’re similar in their composition—the 2009 has a bit more Cabernet Franc (4% vs. 3% in 2008), and both spent 15 months in French oak barrels (72% new), so the differences are clearly due to the weather. The 2009 is full of red fruit and bright acidity to complement its greater depth and density.So what’s ahead? My family and I have already returned to “real life” here in Chile and are assimilating our tremendous experience into our own lives. For me, professionally, it’s a matter of reflecting on everything I learned last year and determining how and where I can apply it in my work. And for Don Melchor? We’ll have to see how it responds to the gentle adjustments we make to help it better express its own rich and unique personality.

    19/6/2013

    The action, with special tasting of six vintages of wine, begins the celebration of the 130th anniversary of Chilean wine at Vinexpo in France

    June 2013 – In the 2013 edition of the most important wine fair in the world, Vinexpo, promoted between 16 and 20 June in Bordeaux, France, Concha y Toro initiates the celebration of its 130 years with the first tasting master classs wine premium Don Melchor. The action will be led by winemaker Enrique Tirado, along with the renowned French adviser Eric Boissenot.

    The master class, with special guests, will present six wine vintages: 1988, 1993, 1999, 2005 and 2007, representing three decades of beverage production.

    Through this vertical tasting, guests will appreciate the master class the story of Don Melchor through different seasons and its consistent development since its inception. “A tasting of this type provides a glimpse of the story of Don Melchor and how is evolving over time. It’s like watching a person in various stages of life, “explains winemaker Enrique Tirado.

    Thus, the Concha y Toro once again highlights its path of global leadership and its commitment to creating distinctive wines that express the characteristics of their origin.

    With a prime location in the exhibition, in the exclusive Club du Lac, where are the most prestigious wineries in the world, Concha y Toro presents during the event, and for the first time at the fair, a booth that represents the flagship of Pirque Casona, located in his winery in the Maipo Valley, Chile, which was the summer residence of the Concha y Toro family during the nineteenth century.

    The booth theme refers to “Three decades Beauty Puente Alto terroir”, which celebrates the creation of the wine Don Melchor, who had his first vintage produced in 1987, when we obtained the best wine that Chile could produce, the height of the great European icons.

    About Don Melchor:

    Don Melchor is the first ultra premium wine industry Chilean, released in 1989 by Concha y Toro. It is the only one with 22 winning seasons and recognized worldwide by critics, winemakers and sommeliers. Touted by many as the best cabernet sauvignon produced in Chile, is a montage of different houses allotted detail vineyard.

    www.donmelchor.com

    About VCT Brazil:

    The VCT Brazil, the Group’s subsidiary and distributor Concha y Toro, the country represents all products of wineries Concha y Toro, Fetzer and Trivento. Founded in 1883, Concha y Toro is the leading Chilean winery and one of the largest producers and exporters world of wine. Its products are sold in 135 countries, and Concha y Toro is among the ten largest wine companies in the world. It has 9,300 acres of vineyards, which ensures quality in its wine production. The Trivento Bodegas y Vineyards is a result of the Group’s expansion Concha y Toro to Argentina in 1996.With growth above the industry trans-Andean, the Trivento ranks fourth in the ranking of Argentine wine exports.

  • JFK 1963

    Chateau le Tuquet 1959  white and a Le Cortin 1959 red were the wines served at the state dinner and reception at Iveagh House on 27th June 1963 for President John F. Kennedy, President of the United States of America.

    Both wines were ‘grand crus’ and extraordinary vintages according to Mary O’ Callaghan, President Irish Guild of Sommeliers.

    Ref. JFK  Stories Irish Independent 15/6/2013

  • RAI Awards 2013

    Best Casual Dining Kindly Sponsored by Joseph Drouhin

    Connaught- Cafe Rua, Mayo
    Munster- Sol y Sombra Tapas Bar, Kerry
    Leinster- An Tintain Restaurant, Westmeath
    Ulster- Coast, Down
    Dublin- Saba
    All-Ireland- Saba

    Best Customer Service Kindly Sponsored by La Rousse Foods

    Connaught- Renvyle House Hotel, Galway
    Munster- Ballygarry House Hotel, Kerry
    Leinster- Eastern Seaboard Bar & Grill, Louth
    Ulster- The Olde Post Inn, Cavan
    Dublin- Saba
    All-Ireland- Renvyle House Hotel

    Best Gastro Pub KindlySponsored by Faustino

    Connaught- Eat @ Massimo, Galway
    Munster- The Derg Inn, Tipperary
    Leinster- Harte’s Bar & Grill, Kildare
    Ulster- The Brewer’s House, Tyrone
    Dublin- The Purty Kitchen
    All-Ireland- The Brewer’s House

    Best Hotel Restaurant Kindly Sponsored by Pallas Foods

    Connaught- The Kitchen Restaurant @ Mount Falcon, Mayo
    Munster- The Munster Room @ Waterford Castle, Waterford
    Leinster- The Lady Helen @ Mount Juliet, Kilkenny
    Ulster- Catalina Restaurant @ Lough Erne Resort, Fermanagh
    Dublin- The Saddle Room @ The Shelbourne Hotel
    All-Ireland- The Lady Helen @ Mount Juliet

    Best Chef Kindly Sponsored by Tipperary Water

    Connaught- Philippe Farineau of Mount Falcon, Mayo
    Munster- Paul Flynn of The Tannery, Waterford
    Leinster- Gary O’Hanlon of Viewmount House, Longford
    Ulster- Neven Maguire of Macnean House, Cavan
    Dublin- Sunil Ghai of Ananda
    All-Ireland- Sunil Ghai of Ananda

    Best Restaurant Kindly Sponsored by Santa Rita

    Connaught- Aniar Restaurant, Galway
    Leinster-Thyme Restaurant, Westmeath
    Munster- The Tannery, Waterford
    Ulster- Browns Restaurant & Champagne Lounge, Derry
    Dublin- Ananda
    All-Ireland- The Tannery

    Best Kids Size Me Kindly Sponsored by Heinz

    Connaught- Sol Rio, Mayo
    Munster- Cornstore Restaurant, Cork
    Leinster- The Olive Grove, Westmeath
    Ulster- The Lemon Tree, Donegal
    Dublin- La Banca
    All-Ireland- Sol Rio

  • Thornton & Banfi Dinner

    Written by Frank Corr
    Friday, 07 June 2013
    Michelin Chef Kevin Thornton is hosting a special evening at his restaurant in St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin 2 on Thursday 27th June at 7.30pm.

    Kevin prides himself on using the finest local produce in season to create an “Experience” and, on this occasion, each magnificent course will be matched with wines from Castello Banfi in Tuscany, including their award winning Brunello di Montalcino which is also served at Banfi’s own renouned Michelin Star restaurant, Ristorante Castello Banfi.  Dante Cecchini from Banfi will guide guests through each of the wines from the Estate. Cover price including a pre-dinner reception, dinner and matching wines is €95.

    Reservations can be made by contacting Tina on (01) 478 7008 or by email

  • Mary O’ Callaghan Honoured in Brussels 30th May 2013

    International Taste & Quality Institute – iTQi

    Consumer Food & Drink tested by a jury of Chefs & Sommeliers

    Mary O’ Callaghan would you like to be invited for the Award Ceremony on Thursday May 30th ?

    .

    I realize that you never attended this great event (400 people attending with a big show) and I’m sure that you would enjoy it very much.

    Attached is the invitation.

    I’m writing the report for our client companies and I am so impressed by your incredible skills.

    It is a pure delight to read your sensory analysis reports which are  so interesting.

    The richness of your vocabulary is quite stunning.

    I already have told you that you are by far the best taster of our group.



    The INTERNATIONAL TASTE & QUALITY INSTITUTE
    is honored to invite Mary O’ Callaghan
    to the Superior Taste Award 2013 Ceremony that will take place on May 30, 2013
    from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Concert Noble, 82 Rue d’Arlon, 1000 Brussels.
    Black tie invited
    Tenue de soirée souhaitée