• Slovenian Wine Tasting

    A tasting of Slovenian Wines will take place  at the United Arts Club, 3, Upper Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin,2 on Wednesday, 14th May,2014 at 3pm

     

  • Reims: A Bubbly Day Trip from Paris

    By Rick Steves

    France’s bustling, modern Reims greets travelers with cellar doors wide open. As the capital of the Champagne region, it features a lively center, a historic cathedral, and, of course, Champagne tasting. And thanks to France’s slick high-speed rail, it’s just 45 minutes from Paris — making it an easy day trip.

    A sound-and-light show in Reims shows how the facade of the cathedral might have looked when it was painted in the 13th century. (photo: Rick Steves)

    Reims (pronounced like “rance”) has a turbulent history: This is where French kings were crowned, where Champagne first bubbled, where WWI devastation met miraculous reconstruction, and where the Germans officially surrendered in 1945, bringing World War II to a close in Europe. The town’s sights give you an informative, entertaining peek at the entire story.

    Start at Reims Cathedral — a glorious example of Gothic architecture and one of Europe’s greatest churches. Built under the direction of four different architects, the church was started about 1211 and mostly finished just 60 years later. Thanks to this quick turnaround, it’s remarkable for its unity and harmony. As a royal coronation site, it is to France what Westminster Abbey is to England.

    For a memorable experience, join the crowd in front of the cathedral for a free, 25-minute sound-and-light show on most summer evenings. I’ve struggled with the idea that some of Europe’s wonderful Gothic church facades were boldly painted in the 13th and 14th centuries. In Reims, the sound-and-light show did a good job of helping me envision how they might have looked to a medieval peasant. Sit directly in front of the cathedral or settle more comfortably into a seat at a café with a clear view through the trees.

    When wonderstruck by Gothic cathedrals, I often contemplate the lives of the people who built these huge buildings back in the 13th century. Construction on a scale like this required a community effort: It was all hands on deck. Most townsfolk who participated donated their money or their labor knowing that they would likely never see it completed — such was their pride, faith, and dedication. Master masons supervised, while the average Jean-Claude did much of the sweaty work. Labor was something that even the poorest medieval peasant could donate generously.

    In addition to spiritual nourishment, Reims offers a more earthly delight — Champagne. Though many wine-growing regions in France produce sparkling wines, only the bubbly beverage from this region can be called Champagne. While the ancient Romans planted the first grapes here, Champagne was not “invented” until the late 17th century, and then it was by virtue of necessity — the local climate and soil did not produce competitive still wines. Today it is commonly regarded as the finest sparkling wine in the world.

    Reims offers many opportunities to visit its world-famous Champagne cellars. All charge entry fees, most have a several daily English tours, and most require a reservation (only Taittinger allows drop-in visits). Which should you visit? Martel offers the most personal and best-value tour. Taittinger andMumm have the most impressive cellars. Veuve Clicquot is popular with Americans and fills up weeks in advance. All told, Mumm is closest to the city center and train station, and offers one of the best tours in Reims. Reservations are essential, especially on weekends.

    As you stroll across town to a Champagne cellar, keep an eye open for “Biscuits Roses” — light, rose-colored egg-and-sugar cookies that have been made here since 1756. They’re the locals’ favorite munchie to accompany a glass of Champagne — you’re supposed to dunk them, but I like them dry (many places that sell these treats offer free samples).

    Allies probably celebrated with Champagne on May 7, 1945, after Germans signed the document of surrender for all German forces. WWII buffs enjoy visiting the Museum of the Surrender (Musée de la Reddition), the place where it happened. The news was announced the next day, turning May 8 into Victory in Europe (V-E) Day. The museum’s extensive collection of artifacts is fascinating, and it’s thrilling to see the war room where Eisenhower managed Allied operations — and where the European part of the war ultimately ended.

    While World War II left the city unscathed, World War I devastated Reims. It was the biggest city on France’s Western Front, and it was hammered — around 65 percent of Reims was destroyed by shelling. Parts of the city center were entirely rebuilt in the 1920s. You’ll see the stylized features — geometric reliefs, motifs in ironwork, rounded corners, and simple concrete elegance — of Art Deco. If it looks eclectic, that’s because the mayor at the time said to build any way you like — just build.

    With its breathtaking Gothic cathedral, historic cityscape, and beloved Champagne cellars, Reims is intoxicating. My time here reminded me of how much fun it is to enjoy modern French culture in a sizeable city that isn’t Paris.

    Rick Steves (www.ricksteves.com) writes European travel guidebooks and hosts travel shows on public television and public radio. Email him at rick@ricksteves.com and follow his blog on Facebook.Tunnels with old-time winemaking and bottling equipment are featured on the Mumm Champagne cellar tour. (photo: Rick Steves)

  • Yalumba Masterclass

    Ms. Jane Ferrari – Winemaker and Communications Consultant from Yalumba conducted an excellent Masterclass tasting for Professional Sommeliers of The Irish Guild of Sommeliers on Monday 7th April, 2014 in the Cellar Bar – Merrion Hotel.
    The wines tasted gave a broad overview of Yalumba’s wines.  Yalumba is a company that is at the forefront and is conscious of creating a sustainable business that is environmental friendly.
    Jane gave a historical ‘time-frame’ of the Barossa which cannot be found in any wine book.  Indeed we were in the presence of a true modern day ‘storyteller.
    This tasting was kindly facilitated by Cassidy Wines Ltd.’
  • Sir Alex Ferguson to auction vintage wine collection valued at £3m

     5,000 bottles to be auctioned in Hong Kong and London

    Alex Ferguson wine

    The collection of about 5,000 bottles, along with signed memorabilia, will be sold at auctions starting in May, and has a pre-sale estimated value of £3m, according to Christie’s.

    Almost two thirds of the cellar consists of Domaine de la Romanee-Conti, a French Burgundy which is “in vogue”, according to the auction company

  • Flaming Pig

    Image via https://www.facebook.com/flamingpigwhiskey

    Flaming Pig just launched and available through Joey Shore, Richmond Marketing, Dublin

    Richmond Head Office
    1st Floor Harmony Court
    Harmony Row
    Dublin 2
    Tel. +353 1 631 6100

    Fax +353 1 639 4882

     

    Orders and Warehouse Office  
    Tel. +353 1 623 3222
    Fax +353 1 623 3233

    Richmond Parkwest Office 
    Unit 43 Parkwest,
    O’Casey Avenue,
    Nangor Road,
    Dublin 12

     

    Email reception@richmondmarketing.com

    Photo

     

    The 1875 Liberties Whiskey Fire.

    April 9, 2014 by dfallon

    One of the most destructive fires in the history of the city occurred on 18 June 1875, when a disastrous fire in the Liberties area of the city saw burning whiskey flow through the streets of the area like lava. A malt house and a bonded warehouse went up in flames, leaving the burning liquid to flow down Ardee Street and Mill Street. The fire began just after 8pm, and contemporary news reports give an idea of just how much burning booze was involved, with the Illustrated London News reporting:

    The fire was at Reid’s malt-house and Malone’s bonded warehouse, in the Liberties. The former had above £2000 worth of malt in it, and the latter, which immediately adjoins it, had 1800 puncheons of whisky, the property of various distillers, and worth £54,000.

    The Illustrated London News reports the blaze. (Image digitised by South Dublin County Libraries, http://source.southdublinlibraries.ie/handle/10599/11048)

    The Illustrated London News reports the blaze. (Image digitised by South Dublin County Libraries, http://source.southdublinlibraries.ie/handle/10599/11048)

    The lava proved devastating to all in its path, at one point seeming to endanger both the Coombe Maternity Hospital and the Carmelite convent in Ormond Street. The wind blew the flames in the opposite direction from the convent, which was hailed by some as a miracle, though the fact many tenement homes were destroyed instead leaves any ‘miracle’ in doubt! In their history of firefighting in Dublin, Tom Geraghty and Trevor Whitehead recounted that the fire wreaked particular havoc on Chamber Street, with a pubic house disappearing in flames, while at another home on the street a wake was in progress, and “the occupants were forced to flee with the corpse to mourn elsewhere, while the home of the bereaved and their belongings were totally destroyed.”

    A particular problem in this area of working class Dublin was the presence of quite a lot of animals. At the time animals were frequently to be found kept at the rear of tenement buildings, while horses were still utilised as a widespread form of transport in the city. The presence of confused animals running up and down the streets of the Liberties only added to the pandemonium of the situation, and when a tannery went up in flames the smoke and smell must have been overbearing. Luckily, the Watkins Brewery at Ardee Street somehow avoided both the flames and the flowing lava, though it goes without saying a brewery going up would have compounded an awful situation.

    The Dublin Fire Brigade did arrive on the scene, under the stewardship of James Robert Ingram, the first Chief Officer of the brigade. We’ve featured Ingram onthe site before. Amazingly given his contribution to public service in Dublin, and the fact the Fire Brigade he established is now over 150 years old, he is buried in an unmarked grave in Mount Jerome Cemetery. Ingram was something of a maverick – a Dubliner by birth, he had learned his trade in the New York Fire Department, and modeled his fledgling Dublin fire service on that of Manhattan, initially christening it the Dublin Fire Department and decking his men out in red shirted uniforms. On one occasion he dealt with a ship drifting into Dublin Port ablaze by ordering the Royal Navy to open fire on it and sink it into the bay, so it’s far to say Ingram was never bound by the restraints of conventional firefighting!

    Ingram understood that pouring water on the flowing lava, as some well-meaning locals had done following the outbreak of the blaze, would have disastrous consequences. Instead, he ordered horse manure to be loaded onto the streets, a change from the Corporation’s usual practice of removing it! The manure, from a nearby depot, successfully stopped the flow of the liquid, allowing the Brigade to focus on the task of burning buildings. Las Fallon, a Dublin firefighter and historian of the Dublin Fire Brigade, has recounted the story for Storymap:

    When it was all over, the Liberties pieced itself back-together, having survived the most costly fire of nineteenth century Dublin. There was a great response to a plea from the Lord Mayor for financial assistance for those affected by the blaze, but beyond the loss of property over a dozen lives were lost. Not a single person burnt to death in the flames, nor did they die of smoke inhalation. Those who died perished because they drank the lava that was flowing through the streets! The Illustrated London Times noted that:

    Crowds of people assembled, and took off their hats and boots to collect the whisky, which ran in streams along the streets. Four persons have died in the hospital from the effects of drinking the whisky, which was burning hot as it flowed. Two corn-porters, named Healy and M’Nulty, were found in a lane off Cork-street, lying insensible, with their boots off, which they had evidently used to collect the liquor. There are many other persons in the hospital who are suffering from the same cause. Two boys are reported to be dying, and it is feared that other deaths will follow.

    There is no plaque in the Liberties to commemorate this event, though funnily enough a new Irish whiskey has adopted the name ‘The Flaming Pig’, as a reference to that crazy night in Dublin, when pigs ran in all directions and the Liberties was saved by horse manure!

     

  • iTQi

     

    ITQI 3

    International Taste & Quality Institute (iTQi)

    During March/April, 2015  Mary O’ Callaghan, , Julie Dupouy & Liam Campbell,  Irish Guild of Sommeliers members along with Jean Smullen were judges at this event in Brussels. The International Taste & Quality Institute – iTQi – based in Brussels, is the world leading organization dedicated to testing and promoting superior food and drink. Judges are selected within the 15 most prestigious European culinary and sommeliers associations such as the Maîtres Cuisiniers de France, Academy of Culinary Arts, Hellenic Chefs’ Association, Académie Culinaire de France, Verband der Köche Deutschlands, Federación de Asociaciones de Cocineros de España, Federerazione dei Cuochi Italiana, Årets Kock of Sweden, Euro-Toques, Gilde Van Nedrlandse Meesterkoks, Associação de Cozinheiros Profisionais de Portugal, Craft Guild of Chefs, Turkish Cooks Association, World Master Chefs Society (WMCS) and the Association de la Sommellerie Internationale (ASI).   The Superior Taste Award is a unique international recognition based upon the blind judgment of Chefs and Sommeliers who are opinion leaders and experts in taste. It offers powerful marketing tools to differentiate food products and beverages:

  • Evelyn Moriarty Competition Winner

    Evelyn Moriarty, Ashford Castle Hotel, Cong, Co. Mayo being presented with her certificate and prize by Oliver Murtagh, President Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Evelyn Moriarty, Ashford Castle Hotel, Cong, Co. Mayo being presented with her certificate and prize by Oliver Murtagh, President Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Andy O' Gorman, Evelyn Moriarty & Oliver Mutrtagh

    Andy O’ Gorman, Evelyn Moriarty & Oliver Mutrtagh

     

    Evelyn Moriarty, Ashford Castle Hotel, Cong, Co. Mayo was presented with her prize and Certificate  after the Guild Annual General Meeting at the Stephen’s Green Hibernian Club, Dublin on 14th April, 2014 by Oliver J. Murtagh, President Irish Guild of Sommeliers

  • Honorary Members Presentations on 14th April, 2014

    Mary O' Callaghan immediate pat President of the Irish Guild of Sommeliers being presented with her Honorary Certificate by Oliver Murtagh, President, Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Mary O’ Callaghan immediate pat President of the Irish Guild of Sommeliers being presented with her Honorary Certificate by Oliver Murtagh, President, Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Chris Donoghue Hon.Trade  President of the Irish Guild of Sommeliers being presented with his Honorary Certificate by Oliver Murtagh, President, Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Chris Donoghue Hon.Trade President of the Irish Guild of Sommeliers being presented with his Honorary Certificate by Oliver Murtagh, President, Irish Guild of Sommeliers

    Andy O' Gorman, Chris Donoghue, Mary O' Callaghan & Oliver Murtagh.

    Andy O’ Gorman, Chris Donoghue, Mary O’ Callaghan & Oliver Murtagh.

  • Syrah/Shiraz

    Syrah/Shiraz Tasting

    Julie Dupouy Best Sommelier in Ireland

    Julie Dupouy Best Sommelier in Ireland,competitor at the World Sommelier competitions in Tokyo, Japan and competitor at the Best Sommelier of Europe contest in Sanremo, Italy during 2013  presented  an excellent tasting of ‘Syrah/Shiraz’ Wines for members of the Irish  Guild  of Sommeliers on  14th  April, 2014 after the AGM at the Stephen’s Green Hibernian Club, 9, St. Stephen’s Green, Dublin,2.

    The following are the wines tasted and tasting sheet.

     

     

    Innocent Bystander Sirah, Victoria 2010

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Deep, dark red with a violet sheen. Orange zest and red summer berry perfumes mingle with a lovely note of black pepper. On the palate, dusty tannins complement flavours of wild blackberries and raspberries. A very earthy and spicy wine with a long, savoury finish.

     SEAustralia map QS 2010

     

     

    Crozes Hermitage “Georges Reynaud”, Domaine Reynaud 2011

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    David Reynaud Domaine Les Bruyères (Bio-Dynamic): Crozes-Hermitage (Rhone Valley)

    Domaine les Bruyères is situated in Crozes-Hermitage at Beaumont-Monteux below the Hermitage hill in the Northern Rhone Valley. The domaine has been part of the Serret / Reynaud family for generations growing and supplying grapes to other producers in the region.  In the year 2000, David Reynaud began his quest to create a 100% bio-dynamic vineyard and to embark on making and marketing the wines from their superbly sited vineyards. This plan came into fruition when in 2003, the domaine became ECO Certified, and in these first few years his talent at winemaking also quickly became apparent and the wines assert brilliance in their complexity and elegance.

    The domaine is made up of 14.5 hectares in Crozes-Hermitage, and an additional 5.5 hectares in local villages amongst the Rhone hills. The vines grown in the domaine are aged between 20 – 50 years, of which 87% is made up of Syrah. Reynaud also has small plantations of Marsanne, Roussanne, Merlot and Viognier. The soil of his Crozes-Hermitage vineyards is characterised by a clay and alluvial pudding stone top-soil with a chalky limestone sub-soil, with good natural ground drainage from the pudding stones. Reynaud, maintains low yields of 35 hl/ha across the Domaine and in a remarkably short time he has gained the attention of the wine press not only in France but around the world. One taste and you will understand why !!

    2011 Crozes-Hermitage rouge ‘Georges Reynaud’ 
    100% Syrah from vines with average age of 20 years. Vinified in cement cuve with cuvaison up to 32 days and very gentle pressing in a vertical press. Elevage on fine lees for 12 months in barrel (none new) then for 6-7 months in cement cuve before bottling.
    “Dark robe, purple rim. Stewed fruits aroma, with a meat gravy, savoury undertone, a rustle of flowers in the air, gaminess behind. Best to decant this. The palate is ready to go – offers soft black fruit notably, with a trace of violet; this leads into a mocha, light chocolate finish. The fruit lasts fine here. A precise wine, with good and careful fruit.” Drinkrhone.com

    P2

     

    Trinity Hill, Gimblet Gravels Syrah 2011- Hawkes Bay

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    The colour is a deep, vibrant crimson. Wild raspberry, blackberry and black pepper aromas predominate. Savoury, spicy notes are also prominent along with some meaty overtones. The Viognier has added a lifted aromatic quality and softened the tannins, making the wine more supple and appealing. Multi-layered complexity is the aim. Powerful but balanced, ripe tannins give the wine great structure. Oak aging plays a minor part and the wine lives on its fruit. Combined with the good acidity, these characteristics mean excellent aging potential.

     

     New Zealand

     

     

     

     

     

     

    John Duval “Entity” Shiraz , Barossa Valley 2010

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    Deep garnet-purple in color, the 2010 Entity Shiraz is scented of ripe blueberries, mulberries and Chinese dried plum with vanilla pod, dark chocolate, cedar, violet and fruit cake nuances. This full-bodied wine is densely packed with black berry preserve and baking spice flavors, has a refreshing acid line to add lift and medium to firm levels of rounded tannins. It has a long length with some oak poking through on the finish. Drink it from 2014 to 2024+.   (2/ 2013)

     Cornas, Domaine du Tunnel 2011

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    In the Cornas, 15 parcels have been vinified separately, the age and style of the barriquespecifically selected to enhance the character of the plot in question. Many of the plots are full of the older vines, found immediately behind the village. To suggest that top Cornas can be in any way approachable in youth is heresy, but Stéphane comes close with his 2011. The elegance and floral flamboyance of the wine are supported by ripe fruit tannins and plenty of silky, savoury charm.

     Blind Tasting: Collezione De Marchi, 2006 Syrah. Located in the central part of the Tuscan Hills between the cities of  Florence and Siena, Italy.

    Visual ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Nose ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

    Palate…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

    2006 Isole e Olena, Syrah ‘Collezione De Marchi’
    Isole e Olena

    100% Syrah

    The first Syrah vines at Isole e Olena were grafted onto old Canaiolo vines in 1984 (the Syrah coming from the Rhone Valley). Paolo De Marchi’s original intention was to use Syrah in the Chianti Classico blend, together with Sangiovese and Canaiolo. The 1984 Chianti Classico DOCG regulations permitted the addition of 10% of a non-traditional grape variety, and as a result, many producers used Cabernet Sauvignon in the blend. De Marchi was more interested in Syrah and was so encouraged by his results that in 1987, he planted a new two-hectare vineyard with Syrah clones from France.

    The Syrah was subsequently released as a varietal and also comprises a small part of the Chianti Classico blend (5%).

    Today, the Syrah vines are planted on three hectares of land. Grapes are 100% destemmed and fermented in temperature controlled stainless steel tanks with ten days maceration on the skins.Delestage and pumping over take place once a day. Delestage is a method of extraction during fermentation that gives wines of good color and soft tannins. The maceration tank is emptied of fermenting must, the cap allowed to dry out for 2-3 hours, and finally, the must is poured back over the cap.

    The wine spends one year in barrel, of which 25% is new French and American oak. It remains two years in bottle before release.

    “”The 2006 Syrah Collezione De Marchi is fascinating in the way it reveals varietal character, but with a distinct Tuscan voice. Deep and intense to the core, the Syrah flows with the essence of black cherries, earthiness, sage, rosemary and tar in a voluptuos, powerful style. This shows magnificent integrity in its fruit and fabulous overall balance. Some of the wildness of the Syrah remains untamed, but this is, nevertheless, a gorgeous bottle blessed with a terrific sense of harmony and a long, silky finish.” –Antonio Galloni, Oct 2010

    Typical Descriptors and Structure for Northern Rhône Syrah

    • Visual: Ruby/Purple Color, Moderate Plus to High Concentration
    • Aromas/Flavors: Moderate Plus Intensity
      • Fruit: Tart/Ripe Black Fruit (Blackberry, Black Cherry, Black Plum), Blue Fruit (Blueberry, Boysenberry), Red Fruit (Raspberry)
      • Possible Carbonic Maceration and/or Stem Inclusion
      • Floral: Purple and Red Flowers, Lavender, Violets
      • Herbal/Green: Black/Green Olive, Green Peppercorn, Herbes de Provence, Rosemary
      • Spice: White/Black Pepper, Curing Spices, Juniper
      • Other: Tar, Hung/Cured Meat, Smoke, Bacon Fat, Band-Aid (Brettanomyces)
      • Earth: Moderate Plus to High Minerality, Granite, Crushed Rock
      • Oak: Neutral Barrel/Cask or Low to Moderate Use of New French Oak
    • Structure: Bone Dry to Dry, Moderate Plus Body, Moderate Plus Tannin, Moderate Plus to High Acidity, Moderate to Moderate Plus Alcohol

     

     

    Typical Descriptors and Structure for South Australia Shiraz

    • Visual: Opaque, Dark Purple Color, High Concentration, Deeply Stained Tears
    • Aromas/Flavors: High Intensity
      • Fruit: Ripe/Lush Black Fruit (Blackberry, Cassis), Lush Blue Fruit (Blueberry, Plum), Dried Fruit (Fig, Raisin, Date), Raspberry Liqueur, Mulberry
      • Floral: Purple and Red Flowers, Lavender (less prominent than in Northern Rhône examples)
      • Herbal/Green: Eucalyptus, MInt/Menthol, Herbes de Provence, Rosemary
      • Spice: Black Pepper, Dried Savory Spices, Licorice, Christmas Spices/Fruitcake
      • Other: Bitter Chocolate, Smoke, Grilled Meat
      • Earth: Low to Moderate Minerality
      • Oak: Low to High Use of New American or French Oak, Vanilla, Coconut, Dill, Chocolate, Mocha, Baking Spices, Cumin, Curry/Fenugreek, Maple
    • Structure: Dry (often with 2-4 g/l of RS), Full Body, Moderate to Moderate Plus Tannin, Moderate to Moderate Plus Acidity, High Alcohol